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Transforming the communities of Essex & East London through Christ’s presence

Liturgy and Prayers

Bible Reading - John 19, 16-37


Live Streams and Video Broadcasts

Church Live Streams in Chelmsford Diocese

Chelmsford Cathedral Facebook:

7.45am – Morning Prayer
Stations of the cross

12 noon - Bishop John’s reflection with reading of the Passion Narrative

Watch here at 12 Noon

5.15pm – Evening prayer

7.30pm- Condensed St John's Passion with a Good Friday homily by Bishop Stephen, St Mary's Maldon


Worship and Activities for all Ages

Listen - Look - Act - Pray


Listen and Watch

Podcast- Walking the Way of the Cross, Prayers and Reflections on the BIblical Stations of the Cross.

By Stephen Cottrell, Paula Gooder and Philip North courtesy of St Nicholas Durham Website.

 

Video- A Good Friday Reflection by the Rt Rev Roger Morris, Bishop of Colchester

 

Video - The Passion According to Matthew by the Epping Team Ministry

 

Video - Falling by Revd Caroline Beckett (featured art by Turvey Abbey)

 

Video - Cross by Revd Caroline Beckett (featured art by Turvey Abbey)

 

Music - The Cruxifixion- John Stainer

 

Music- When I Survey, Tim Hughes

 

Music- When I Survey, Instrumental by Brynn Haworth

 

Meet Mary the Mother of Jesus - An interactive story supplied by Emma Anderton

A story for Good Friday to remind us that  Jesus’  mother, Mary was with Jesus while he died on the cross.

Read this story by all joining in together, reading and repeating or by reading a couple of lines each.

Jesus’ mother, Mary was there right from the birth of her tiny baby.

Jesus’ mother, Mary was there right from the birth of her tiny baby and as he carried the heavy cross up the hill.

Jesus’ mother, Mary was there right from the birth of her tiny baby and as he carried the heavy cross up the hill and as they put him on the cross.

Jesus’ mother, Mary was there right from the birth of her tiny baby and as he carried the heavy cross up the hill and as they put him on the cross and as he looked with love at his family and friends.

Jesus’ mother, Mary was there right from the birth of her tiny baby and as he carried the heavy cross up the hill and as they put him on the cross and as he looked with love at his family and friends and as he cried out to God in fear and pain.

Jesus’ mother, Mary was there right from the birth of her tiny baby and as he carried the heavy cross up the hill and as they put him on the cross and as he looked with love at his family and friends and as he cried out to God in fear and pain and died.

Jesus’ mother, Mary was there right from the birth of her tiny baby and as he carried the heavy cross up the hill and as they put him on the cross and as he looked with love at his family and friends and as he cried out to God in fear and pain and as he died and as his body was laid in the tomb.

Jesus’ mother, Mary was there right from the birth of her tiny baby and as he carried the heavy cross up the hill and as they put him on the cross and as he looked with love at his family and friends and as he cried out to God in fear and pain and as he died and as his body was laid in the tomb. And, Jesus’ mother, Mary was there three days later, when he rose from the dead!!

 

Song - You Didn't Wait

 

A collection of poems by Rev Caroline Beckett for Good Friday


Look

A Visual Table Display by Emma Anderton

On Palm Sunday we asked you to collect leaves from the garden, or make leaves from green paper place to them on the tray in the centre of your prayer space. 

Today, add a cross by making one from twigs, using one you have at home, drawing and cutting one out or you could make a cross by laying two scarves on the floor in a cross shape.


Act

Easter Garden by Emma Anderton

Create an Easter garden, either using items from your garden: twigs for the three crosses, moss, a stone and small plant pot (or yogurt pot) for the tomb or building one using Lego of you have it.

Cut a cross out of paper or card and decorate both sides: one side in dark colours to represent the sadness of Jesus dying and the other side in bright colours to remind us that God is the creator who loves the whole world.

 

Holy Week Table Display by Rachel Summers

On Palm Sunday we provided instruction to make a table display using advent candles or tea lights on a tray.

Find out more here.

Here's what you can do today:
Light all five candles, then snuff all five out. Add a small cross as you tell the story of Jesus’ death.

You can pass the cross around the table, so each of you can spend a moment in silent prayer and thankfulness, before placing it on the tray.

 

Holy Week Window Gallery by Rachel Summers

On Palm Sunday we provided instruction to make a Window Gallery.

Find out more here.

Here's what you might make to put in your gallery today:

Use dark and sombre colours to create a cross.

Hot Cross buns

Baking your way through Holy Week by Rachel Summers

What else could we cook today apart from Hot Cross Buns!

The great thing about making a yeasted bun, is that it’s something you spend time with, and then come back to, over time. Some church traditions have a service between 12 and 3, marking the hours Jesus spent on the cross- you might like to spend that time prayerfully making hot cross buns, with each time you come back to the baking, stepping back into the story, re-immersing yourself in the pain and the wonder of Good Friday.

The first job you need to do to make hot cross buns is to heat up some milk and some butter. You can either do this by adding 50g of butter to 300ml of hot milk, stirring until it melts, and leaving it to cool to a hand-warm temperature, or melting the butter separately in the microwave and mixing it with milk that has been warmed to hand-warm temperature. As the butter melts and mixes in with the milk, you might like to think of the moment in the Eucharist when the priest mixes a little water in with the wine, and prays, ‘by the mystery of this wine and water, may we share in the divinity of Christ who humbled himself to share in our humanity’. The Jesus we follow, being both fully human and fully God, undergoing today the most brutal of human punishments.

Fill a mixing bowl with 500g of strong bread flour (I’d choose white, though it depends on what you can get! If you can’t find bread flour, plain flour will work; the buns just won’t rise as much). Add in 1tsp of salt, 75g of caster sugar (again, use what sugar you can), and a sachet of yeast. If you can’t get hold of yeast, but have got a sourdough starter going in your house, I have found an overnight sourdough version online, but have yet to give it a try. As you add the dry ingredients, think through what you are laying at the foot of the cross today.

Make a well in the centre, pour in the warm milk and butter, and add an egg. Mix this well, first with a wooden spoon, then with your hands, until you have a sticky dough. Now for the fun bit! Sprinkle some flour onto a surface, and knead it, by stretching and folding, until it’s turned nice and silky and pulls out smoothly. Leave it in a bowl, covered with something like a clean plastic bag or a shower hat, for an hour, so that the yeast can begin to work and make the dough rise.

After an hour, it’s time to add the dried fruit and spices, so that the hot cross buns taste like the real deal. I don’t know what you’ve got in your house. Certainly don’t be heading out to buy stuff specially! If we can’t glory in a bit of a bodge job at the moment, when else can we? I’ve got some sultanas and raisins, but no currants. I don’t have peel either, though do have some oranges, so might chop the orange peel up small and include that. I doubt I’ll actually get round to crystallising it myself in a sugar solution, but if that sounds like fun, you go for it! A chopped up apple would do for fruit if your dried fruit is scarce. I’ve got a tub of cinnamon, but mixed spice, or ground cloves, or even ground ginger would probably do. 1tsp of spice should do it. I’ll leave it to you to put in as much dried fruit as you fancy -I seldom measure it anyway even in times of plenty! Knead these in to the dough, as you do so remembering the way Jesus was pummelled at the hands of the soldiers, and of how dough needs to be pummelled before it can begin to rise, and to turn into bread to feed us all.

Shape the dough into balls, and place them on a floured baking tray. Cover and leave for another hour to rise. Mix up flour and water paste, and use this to pipe (if you have the equipment) or dollop (if you don’t!) a cross over each bun. Remember Jesus and his words on the cross, and quietly thank him for his sacrifice. Bake in a hot oven (220C/GM7) for about twenty minutes until they look golden brown. Once out of the oven, gently heat some marmalade or apricot jam, and paint this over the top of them to make a sticky glaze. Enjoy, buttered if you like, with a cup of tea, and sing or listen to your favourite songs or hymns about the cross as you eat them.


Pray

Spend some time reading the story of Jesus death on the cross in whichever way you prefer. Or listen to the words of the song, You Didn't Wait (above).

Look at the cross you have placed on your tray or the floor.

Think how Jesus showed love for his mother and ‘favourite disciple’ even at the last moments of his life.

Imagine how much he loves you too.

Resources for each day

The links below take you to the resources for the relevant day 

Palm Sunday

Holy Monday

Holy Tuesday

Holy Wednesday

Maundy Thursday

Good Friday

Holy Saturday

Easter Sunday


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